IoT Design Considerations: Interoperability

As more manufacturers enable their products for the IoT, consumers will be introduced to many different cloud applications due to lack of cooperation between difference devices and companies. This is where the emerging IoT standards can help. Device manufacturers who support these standards will be able to ensure their products will be able to work and communicate with other manufacturers’ products that support the same protocols. This makes operating many IoT-enabled devices together much more simple and convenient. This also opens up new business opportunities by allowing for new features that the original manufacturers never dreamed of. For example, interoperability means that one day it might be possible for a consumer to simply say, “good night, house” to their home automation app, and the app will programmatically turn-off all of the main house lights, TV’s and appliances and turn on the outside lighting, set the alarm clock for the morning and set the coffee pot to start brewing when the sun rises. In this example, each device could be from a different manufacturer, but since they all support the same standard, the application knows how to talk to them all and create new service offerings.

Some of the emerging interoperability standards include: Thread (supported by the likes of Google/Nest, Samsung and more), HomeKit (supported by Apple), AllJoyn (supported by Microsoft and Sony, part of the AllSeen Alliance), IETF (an internet standards body) and ETSI (a European-based standards organization – primarily in Telecom). The standards landscape is changing rapidly and manufacturers need to adapt their products to work with these standards as they are consolidated and settled in the future.

To download the complete Internet of Things Design Considerations White Paper, click here: http://gridconnect.com/10-internet-of-things-design-considerations

10 Internet of Things (IoT) Design Considerations: Interoperability and Security

9. Interoperability

As more manufacturers enable their products for the IoT, consumers will be introduced to many different cloud applications due to lack of cooperation between difference devices and companies. This is where the emerging IoT standards can help. Device manufacturers who support these standards will be able to ensure their products will be able to work and communicate with other manufacturers’ products that support the same protocols. This makes operating many IoT-enabled devices together much more simple and convenient. This also opens up new business opportunities by allowing for new features that the original manufacturers never dreamed of. For example, interoperability means that one day it might be possible for a consumer to simply say, “good night, house” to their app, and the app will programmatically turn-off all of the main house lights, TV’s and appliances and turn on the outside lighting, set the alarm clock for the morning and set the coffee pot to start brewing when the sun rises. In this example, each device could be from a different manufacturer, but since they all support the same standard, the application knows how to talk to them all and create new service offerings.

Some of the emerging interoperability standards include: Thread (supported by the likes of Google/Nest, Samsung and more), HomeKit (supported by Apple), AllJoyn (supported by Microsoft and Sony, part of the AllSeen Alliance), IETF (an internet standards body) and ETSI (a European-based standards organization – primarily in Telecom). The standards landscape is changing rapidly and manufacturers need to adapt their products to work with these standards as they are consolidated and settled in the future.

10. Security

Building a secure IoT-enabled device comes at a cost. As the IoT continues to grow, there is an increasing focus on its security and how safe the claims of end-to-end solutions really are. While security threats in the news have scared away some manufacturers and consumers from entering the IoT space, others view it as an opportunity for added value to their products. Implementing high-cost security into every product a company has is ideal, however not very economical. Manufacturers must find proper security for each of their IoT solutions while keeping costs down for them and their end-user.

This process must start at the time of a product’s conception. Proper due-diligence is required from each manufacturer to find a way to secure their devices, protect their consumer and ultimately, the rest of the IoT world as well.

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>  For more information, please call Grid Connect Inc. at +1 (630) 245-1445, or email us at iot@gridconnect.com.

Thread Group Membership Grows To More Than 50 Companies

SAN RAMON, Calif. - Dec. 16, 2014 – The Thread Group (www.threadgroup.org) – an industry alliance chartered with guiding the widespread adoption of Thread, the new IP-based low-power wireless networking protocol designed specifically for the home, announced today that it has grown to more than 50 members since membership opened up on Oct 1st. Additionally, the Thread Group will work with UL to perform testing and certification to ensure a high-quality user experience, as well as interoperability and security across products using Thread.

The newest Thread Group members include: ATMEL®, California Eastern Laboratories, Inc., CamPoint, Energizer® Holdings, Inc., GainSpan Corporation, Granite River Labs, Grid Connect, Imagination Technologies, Insteon®, Intellihot Green Technologies Inc., iOT Tech, Jasco®, Keen Home, Kwikset, leakSMART, Linx Technologies, LUX Technology Group, Marvell Technology Group Ltd., Midea Group, Nanoleaf, NET2GRID, Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Proximetry, Inc., SALTO SYSTEMS, Sansa Security, Shenzhen Rakwireless Technology Co., Ltd, Skyley Networks, Inc., Stack Lighting, Telegesis, TÜV Rheinland Group, Tyco, UL, Whirlpool Corporation, WigWag Inc, ZONEFIRST®.

Read the full press release from the Thread Group by clicking here.

IoT/M2M Will Continue to be the Most Hyped Technology in 2015, Says Grid Connect

It’s official: the Internet of Things (IoT) is the most hyped technology of 2014.

In August, analyst group Gartner released its 2014 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies report, and IoT replaced big data at the top. The ability to connect and control smart devices remotely via the Internet will reach its final stage of maturity in just five to 10 years, according to Gartner’s analysts, much quicker than they imagined just a few short years ago.

Building on the growth of IoT in 2014, the new year will see even more explosive growth and innovation. Here are a few of my predictions for 2015…

Read more at Policy Charging Control or download the PDF now.